Message from the President

Duncan McConnel

Duncan McConnel  LCAPres

10 June 2015

Uniform Law

The goal of an Australian legal profession moves a significant step closer from 1 July this year with the introduction of the Legal Profession Uniform Law Framework in New South Wales and Victoria.The Legal Profession Uniform Law Framework that begins on 1 July 2015 will bring the legal profession in those states together to create a common legal services market under a uniform legal profession law and uniform rules. An inter-jurisdictional Legal Services Council and a Commissioner for Uniform Legal Services Regulation have been established to monitor and promote consistency in the way the new regulatory system is implemented and operates.

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What's New?

2 July 2015: Legal profession disappointed by National Partnership Agreement on legal assistance services
The Law Council of Australia has said the National Partnership Agreement on legal assistance services announced yesterday by the Commonwealth Attorney-General is a major disappointment that ignores the Productivity Commission's recommendation for a $200 million increase in Legal Aid Commission funding.

2 July 2015: No excuse for Government's failure to replace retiring family court judges
The Law Council of Australia has called on the Federal Government to make a clear public commitment to immediately replace retiring judges in the Family and Federal Circuit Courts, with recent replacement delays causing unacceptable hold-ups in justice for at-risk children and families.

30 June 2015: Uniform Law takes vital step towards harmonisation
The introduction of a uniform system of legal profession regulation has been a goal of the Law Council of Australia for many years. The Law Council considers the introduction of
the Legal Profession Uniform Law (LPUL) in New South Wales and Victoria to be a significant milestone, a vital step towards a truly national profession, and a positive example of the profession taking a leadership role in setting its own standards.

18 June 2015: Proposed citizenship revocation laws must abide with the Constitution and rule of law
The Law Council of Australia has expressed concern over current proposals for a minister to have a complete discretion to remove citizenship from a person suspected of terrorist activity. This is contemplated to be the case without there first being a conviction or judicial review to challenge the basis of a decision, contrary to the Constitution and rule of law.